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Rauwolscine

Rauwolscine is a molecule which is very similar in structure to yohimbine, and probably similar in its effects as well; may be more potent, but limited evidence exists.

Our evidence-based analysis on rauwolscine features 4 unique references to scientific papers.

Research analysis led by Kamal Patel.
All content reviewed by the Examine.com Team. Published: Jul 12, 2013
Last Updated:

Summary of Rauwolscine

Primary Information, Benefits, Effects, and Important Facts

Rauwolscine is what is known as a diastereoisomers of Yohimbine. There are 3 diastereoisomers, the other two being corynanthine and 3-epi-alpha-yohimbine. Basically, it is an alternate form of it with slightly altered properties.

It's mechanisms of action are very similar to yohimbine, as it can act as an Alpha(2)Adrenergic antagonist and thus aid in fat burning (not so much by inducing fat loss, but by alleviating pressures the body exerts to preserve fat mass; its like preventing the body from stopping the fat loss, but doesn't induce it directly). Rauwolscine shows some promise in being more effective due to higher potency on the same receptor.

It also shares the same aphrodisiac and mood-elevating effects as yohimbine, although the potency on this relative to yohimbine is not known.

Things To Know & Note

Is a Form Of

Other Functions:

Primary Function:

Also Known As

Alpha-yohimbine, isoyohimbine

Do Not Confuse With

Yohimbine

Goes Well With

  • Adrenaline increasing compounds like Caffeine

  • Rauwolscine is highly stimulatory and may also be mood-elevating.

How to Take Rauwolscine

Recommended dosage, active amounts, other details

There is insufficient information for recommending a dosage of rauwolscine, although usually the dosing of yohimbine supplementation is extrapolated onto rauwolscine.

Scientific Research on Rauwolscine

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Rauwolscine, or {3H}Rauwolscine, is a potent and selective antagonist of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors.[1] This is the same mechanism by which yohimbine acts.

{3H}Rauwolscine is less potent than yohimbine in protecting against adrenaline-induced blood pressure increases (both of which were less potent than corynanthine and more potent than 3-epi-alpha-yohimbine), this effect seems related to their affinity for the alpha-2 adrenoreceptor.[2]

Like yohimbine, rauwolscine is an agonist of 5-HT1a/b receptors and induce serotonin-like effects. While yohimbine has more affinity for the receptor, rauwolscine has a lower IC50 value (meaning it can saturate more receptors at the same dose) and can be seen as slightly more potent in serotonergic activity.[3][4]Rauwolscine: an antagonist radioligand for the cloned human 5-hydroxytryptamine2b (5-HT2B) receptor|published=1998 Jan|authors=Wainscott DB, Sasso DA, Kursar JD, Baez M, Lucaites VL, Nelson DL|journal=Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol]

References

  1. ^ Perry BD, U'Prichard DC. (3H)rauwolscine (alpha-yohimbine): a specific antagonist radioligand for brain alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. Eur J Pharmacol. (1981)
  2. ^ Rockhold RW, Gross F. Yohimbine diastereoisomers: cardiovascular effects after central and peripheral application in the rat. Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol. (1981)
  3. ^ Arthur JM, Casañas SJ, Raymond JR. Partial agonist properties of rauwolscine and yohimbine for the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by recombinant human 5-HT1A receptors. Biochem Pharmacol. (1993)
  4. ^ [3H.