Quick Navigation

C-Reactive Protein

C-Reactive Protein is an inflammatory biomarker for cardiovascular disease and artherosclerosis (arterial plaque). Its reduction is thought to be protective and reduces the risk of cardiovascular incidents.

Research analysis led by Kamal Patel.
All content reviewed by the Examine.com Team. Published: Jul 5, 2013
Last Updated:

Human Effect Matrix

The Human Effect Matrix looks at human studies (it excludes animal and in vitro studies) to tell you what supplements affect c-reactive protein
Grade Level of Evidence
Robust research conducted with repeated double-blind clinical trials
Multiple studies where at least two are double-blind and placebo controlled
Single double-blind study or multiple cohort studies
Uncontrolled or observational studies only
Level of Evidence
? The amount of high quality evidence. The more evidence, the more we can trust the results.
Outcome Magnitude of effect
? The direction and size of the supplement's impact on each outcome. Some supplements can have an increasing effect, others have a decreasing effect, and others have no effect.
Consistency of research results
? Scientific research does not always agree. HIGH or VERY HIGH means that most of the scientific research agrees.
Notes
grade-a - Very High See all 16 studies
Although some decreases have been noted, the vast majority of the evidence suggests that there is no significant influence
grade-b Minor High See all 15 studies
May decrease C-reactive protein if elevated. Studies are somewhat inconsistent, but an effect in those who will benefit most is likely.
grade-b Minor High See all 3 studies
There is a decrease in C-Reactive Protein (inflammatory biomarker) in those with higher baseline inflammation or inflammatory disease conditions, but not in healthy persons.
grade-b Minor High See all 4 studies
Supplementation of zinc in persons who may be zinc deficient is able to reduce C-reactive protein
grade-b - Very High See all 8 studies
Most studies assessing cocoa flavanols do not find reliable reductions in C-reactive protein when compared to placebo or control treatments.
grade-b - High See all 8 studies
For the most part, CLA is seen as ineffective.
grade-b - - See study
grade-b - High See all 3 studies
Most studies assessing C-reactive protein (an inflammatory biomarker) have failed to find a significant influence of vitamin E supplementation.
grade-c Notable Very High See 2 studies
A decrease in C-Reactive protein has only been noted in rheumatoid arthritis (none in obese but healthy persons) but reached 30% within 30 days of 500mg krill oil, a very significant reduction
grade-c Minor - See study
A decrease in C-reactive protein is noted with fucoxanthin ingestion
grade-c Minor - See study
A decrease in C-reactive protein is noted with supplementation of Ginkgo biloba
grade-c Minor - See study
May reduce levels of C-reactive protein
grade-c Minor - See study
A decrease in C-reactive protein has been noted, confounded with weight loss and industry influence
grade-c Minor Moderate See 2 studies
Possible reduction in C-Reactive protein, but these changes are unreliable
grade-c Minor - See study
A decrease in C-reactive protein has been noted with rhodiola supplementation; practical significance of these results unknown
grade-c Minor - See 2 studies
It is possible that a decrease in C-Reactive protein may exist but evidence is contradictory at this moment in time
grade-c Minor - See study
Minor decrease in C-reactive protein concentrations
grade-c Minor Very High See all 5 studies
A possible reduction in C-Reactive Protein exists with Vitamin C supplementation
grade-c - - See study
C-reactive protein does not appear to be influenced by alanylglutamine
grade-c - Moderate See 2 studies
Although there may be a reduction of C-Reactive protein in some populations, for the most part ALA does not seem significantly effective in reducing this inflammatory biomarker of cardiovascular disease
grade-c - - See study
No significant alterations seen in C-RP with black cohosh
grade-c - Very High See all 3 studies
C-reactive protein does not appear to be influenced with blueberry supplementation.
grade-c - Very High See 2 studies
No significant influence on C-reactive protein, a biomarker for inflammation. One study did find an beneficial effect in women with PCOS, however.
grade-c - - See study
No significant influence on C-reactive protein concentrations
grade-c - Very High See 2 studies
No significant influence on levels of C-reactive protein
grade-c - Very High See 2 studies
C-reactive protein does not appear to be significantly influenced with supplementation of colostrum relative to control or baseline values.
grade-c - - See study
grade-c - - See study
No significant effect on C-Reactive Protein
grade-c - - See study
No significant interactions with C-reactive protein have been detected
grade-c - Very High See 2 studies
No significant influence on C-reactive protein is noted with supplementation of garlic.
grade-c - - See study
No significant alterations in C-Reactive Protein levels
grade-c - - See study
No significant influence on C-reactive protein
grade-c - - See study
grade-c - - See study
grade-c - - See study
No significant influence on C-reactive protein
grade-c - - See study
The alterations in C-reactive protein failed to reach statistical significance, but are otherwise not very well explored.
grade-c - Very High See 2 studies
No significant influence on C-reactive protein levels
grade-c - - See study
No significant alterations in C-Reactive protein noted
grade-c - - See study
No significant effect on C-reactive protein
grade-c - - See study
No significant alteration in C-reactive protein
grade-c - Moderate See all 5 studies
Preliminary studies showed marked reductions in C-reactive protein concentrations in healthy persons, although more recently conducted blinded studies have failed to replicate such a large decrease.
grade-c - - See study
No significant influence on C-Reactive Protein
grade-c - - See study
2,000mg of the sea buckthorn supplement has failed to significantly influence C-reactive protein concentrations in serum
grade-c - - See study
grade-c - - See study
C-reactive protein concentrations in serum do not appear to be affected with supplementation of riboflavin.
grade-c - Very High See 2 studies
In otherwise healthy subjects as well as dyslipidemics, C-reactive protein does not appear to be altered in its concentration relative to control.
grade-c - Very High See 2 studies
No significant influence on C-reactive protein (an inflammatory biomarker) seen with vitamin K supplementation
grade-c - - See study
No demonstrated effects on C-Reactive Protein
grade-d Notable Very High See 2 studies
Studies suggest a notable reduction that is probably dose-dependent. Note that research for this purpose currently is exclusively funded by industry.
grade-d Notable - See study
Appears to reduce C-reactive protein, with the degree of reduction being noted almost a halving
grade-d Notable - See study
The decrease in C-reactive protein seen in one study in otherwise healthy humans reached 45% after three weeks of supplementation.
grade-d Minor - See study
There may be a small decrease in C-reactive protein associated with moderate iodine supplementation in otherwise healthy persons, indicative of an antiinflammatory effect.
grade-d Minor - See study
A decrease in C-RP has been noted with safflower oil consumption
grade-d - - See study
No significant effect on this inflammatory biomarker
grade-d - - See study
No significant influence on C-reactive protein concentrations even in persons with metabolic syndrome.
grade-d - - See study
grade-d - - See study
No significant alterations in serum C-rp levels
grade-d - - See study
In otherwise healthy men, there are no changes in C-reactive protein levels seen with berry consumption.
grade-d - Very High See 2 studies
No significant influence on C-Reactive Protein levels
grade-d - - See study
No changes of note in people with high blood sugar