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Luteinizing Hormone

Luteinizing hormone (LH) is a hormone that is secreted from the pituitary and is known to regulate fertility and stimulate testosterone production from the testicles. Its increase is thought to promote testosterone (somewhat unreliably).

Research analysis led by Kamal Patel.
All content reviewed by the Examine.com Team. Published: Jul 5, 2013
Last Updated:

Things To Know & Note

Also Known As

LH

Human Effect Matrix

The Human Effect Matrix looks at human studies (it excludes animal and in vitro studies) to tell you what supplements affect luteinizing hormone
Grade Level of Evidence
Robust research conducted with repeated double-blind clinical trials
Multiple studies where at least two are double-blind and placebo controlled
Single double-blind study or multiple cohort studies
Uncontrolled or observational studies only
Level of Evidence
? The amount of high quality evidence. The more evidence, the more we can trust the results.
Outcome Magnitude of effect
? The direction and size of the supplement's impact on each outcome. Some supplements can have an increasing effect, others have a decreasing effect, and others have no effect.
Consistency of research results
? Scientific research does not always agree. HIGH or VERY HIGH means that most of the scientific research agrees.
Notes
grade-b - Very High See all 3 studies
No significant influence on luteinizing hormone noted with maca ingestion
grade-b - Very High See all 3 studies
Luteinizing hormone does not appear to be significantly influenced with oral supplementation of red clover extract in postmenopausal women.
grade-c Minor Very High See all 3 studies
An increase in luteinizing hormone has been detected with ashwagandha supplementation.
grade-c Minor - See study
A decrease in luteinizing hormone has been detected with CoQ10 supplementation
grade-c Minor - See study
An increase in luteinizing hormone has been noted
grade-c - Very High See all 5 studies
No significant influence of alcohol on luteinizing hormone levels when consumed moderately
grade-c - Very High See 2 studies
No significant influence of chromium supplementation on luteinizing hormone (LH) in women with PCOS relative to placebo.
grade-c - Very High See 2 studies
No significant alterations detected in luteinizing hormone levels
grade-c - - See study
LH concentrations are unaffected by saffron supplementation at 60mg in infertile men.
grade-c - - See study
No significant influence on luteinizing hormone
grade-c - Very High See all 4 studies
A consistent influence on luteinizing hormone hasn't been detected with supplemental tribulus
grade-c - - See study
No significant influence on luteinizing hormone levels
grade-c - - See study
Vitamin E supplementation does not appear to influence circulating levels of luteinizing hormone (LH).
grade-d Notable - See study
Although the study is limited by lack of placebo control and disclosure of dosage, ginger is associated with a 43.2% increase in serum luteinizing hormone over three months in infertile men.
grade-d Minor - See study
An increase in LH concentrations has been noted to 30-60% in infertile men, correlating well with the testosterone increases seen in this study.
grade-d Minor - See study
In persons who are deficient in zinc, an increase in LH occurs following zinc replenishment.
grade-d - High See all 3 studies
More evidence than not suggests no significant changes in lutenizing hormone, although limited evidence suggests an increase of minor magnitude.
grade-d - - See study
No significant alterations in luteinizing hormone has been detected with pueraria lobata ingestion.