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Rate of Perceived Exertion

The rate of percieved exertion (RPE) is a subjective measurement of how difficult it is to conduct an exercise, usually used during cardiovascular exercise. Reducing the RPE may help with performance by allowing one to push harder (due to less difficulty and pain).

Research analysis led by Kamal Patel.
All content reviewed by the Examine.com Team. Published: Jul 5, 2013
Last Updated:

Things To Know & Note

Also Known As

RPE

Human Effect Matrix

The Human Effect Matrix looks at human studies (it excludes animal and in vitro studies) to tell you what supplements affect rate of perceived exertion
Grade Level of Evidence
Robust research conducted with repeated double-blind clinical trials
Multiple studies where at least two are double-blind and placebo controlled
Single double-blind study or multiple cohort studies
Uncontrolled or observational studies only
Level of Evidence
? The amount of high quality evidence. The more evidence, the more we can trust the results.
Outcome Magnitude of effect
? The direction and size of the supplement's impact on each outcome. Some supplements can have an increasing effect, others have a decreasing effect, and others have no effect.
Consistency of research results
? Scientific research does not always agree. HIGH or VERY HIGH means that most of the scientific research agrees.
Notes
grade-b Minor High See all 5 studies
Although the effects are somewhat unreliable, there appears to be a reduction in the rate of perceived exertion associated with caffeine ingestion
grade-b - Very High See all 10 studies
Although there is some limited evidence that sodium bicarbonate can increase 'percieved readiness' for a task and ample evidence that it can reduce the rate of neuromuscular decline (seen with fatigue), the actual rate of percieved exertion (how hard an exercise feels) is wholly unaffected.
grade-b - Very High See all 3 studies
No significant influence of betaine (acute or two weeks of supplementation) on the rate of perceived exertion.
grade-c Minor - See study
There is some evidence to support a reduction in the rate of perceived exertion during exercise under the influence of BCAA supplementation, but this appears to unreliably improve performance and is of low magnitude
grade-c Minor - See study
A decrease in the rate of perceived exertion has been noted with CoQ10 supplementation
grade-c Minor - See study
A reduction in the rate of perceived exertion appears to exist following carnitine supplementation
grade-c Minor Moderate See 2 studies
May reduce the rate of perceived exertion in some instances (prolonged cardiovascular exercise), but is not highly reliable.
grade-c Minor - See study
Possibly effective if confounded with fatigue (the antifatigue effects may reduce the rate of percieved exertion during submaximal exercise) but there does not appear to be strong effects in maximal effort trials
grade-c Minor - See study
The rate of percieved exertion in obese adults appears to be attenuated with Vitamin C supplementation
grade-c - - See study
No significant alterations in the rate of perceived exertion during loaded carrying exercises
grade-c - - See study
grade-c - - See study
Despite possible influences on fatigue production, there is currently no demonstrated reduction in the rate of perceived exertion during exercise
grade-c - - See study
No significant influence on the rate of perceived exertion
grade-c - - See study
No significant influence on the rate of perceived exertion when a single dose is taken acutely
grade-c - - See study
grade-c - - See study
No significant influence on the rate of perceived exertion associated with Maca root
grade-c - - See study
No significant influence on the rate of perceived exertion during exercise
grade-c - - See 2 studies
grade-c - - See study
grade-d - - See study
Despite alterations in power output seen, the rate of perceived exertion in otherwise sedentary persons is not affected.
grade-d - Very High See 2 studies
The rate of perceived exertion during exercise does not appear to be altered when cocoa flavanols are ingested prior to exercise.